Srixon Z-Star vs Titleist Pro V1

Srixon Z-Star vs Titleist Pro V1

Since launching in October of 2000 the Pro V1 has taken the golf world by storm. Roughly 70% of professionals on the worlds major tours use the ball. That’s a pretty big endorsement especially if you are a pretty good golfer.

However there is one thing about the Titleist Pro V1 that always put me off – the cost! You could rarely find the balls below their MSRP which is now around the $50 mark. Despite being a single figure player for many years I just don’t want to spend $4 per ball!

I’ve always quite liked the Srixon Z-Star because it plays like a Pro V1 but I can pick them up for about 2/3 the cost most of the time.

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Titleist Pro V1 Golf Balls

Titleist Pro V1 golf balls are made for golfers looking for high-performance balls. They feature reduced spin off the driver, and stable flight. The Pro V1’s multi-component construction includes a soft compression core, and a urethane elastomer cover. The ball provides excellent distance, control and durability. If you’re looking to improve your game or play at a high level, Pro V1 balls are a excellent choice.

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Srixon Z-Star Golf Balls

The Srixon Z-Star golf balls are designed for advanced golfers looking for a combination of distance, control, and feel. They feature Srixon’s patented Spin Skin coating, which increases friction for more spin on short shots, and a 338 Speed Dimple pattern that reduces drag for improved distance. The Srixon Z-Star is a 3-piece golf ball and is available in white and yellow color options. With its combination of distance, control, and feel, the Z-Star is a versatile option for golfers of all skill levels.

Does Your Choice Of Golf Ball Make Any Difference?

This is one of those classic “it depends” questions. Generally speaking the lower your handicap the more important your choice of ball. If you have a handicap of 28 then with the best will in the world it’s not going to make much difference to your score whether you play a Pro V1 or Top-Flite!

If you play off single figures then you probably care quite a lot about your golf game and so using a better quality ball will be important to you. In some respects it may only be a case of helping your confidence. Even so choosing a ball you are comfortable with should help your game.

Mark Crossfield compares Pro V1 and Z-Star

What To Consider When Choosing A Golf Ball?

Arguably the two biggest considerations when choosing a golf ball are the spin rate and the feel.

If you want to get some stop on your approaches and chips then you need to go for a best golf balls like the Pro V1 or Srixon Z Star. A premium ball allows you to play a wider variety of short game shots around the green. The urethane cover on these balls allows you to get more grip and impart spin on the ball.

Many players these days want a ball that fees a little softer. Manufacturers are only to happy to oblige by offering plenty of balls with a soft feel.

Some players underestimate the importance of the feel off the putter face. You take around 40% of your shots on the green so make sure your feel comfortable with the ball when using your putter.

You should also look at your swing speed. Most ball manufacturers will suggest the sort of club head speed you need to get the most out of a particular ball. If you aren’t swinging over 85 mph then you might be better off with a mid-range or budget ball instead.

How Much Do Tour Quality Balls Cost?

Titleist balls don’t tend to sell for much less than their MSRP. If you shop around you might be able to get a dozen ProV1s for around $45. They are the market leaders and can charge what they like within reason because many people are happy to pony up.

The Z-Stars are one of the cheaper options from the major ball companies. They have an MSRP of $43 but you can generally find them for less than $40. I regularly pick up logo overrun version of the ball for around $30. I can’ say I notice a difference between the Z-Star and Pro V1 during play so in my opinion that is a pretty hefty saving.

You can find some direct-to-consumer brands doing urethane balls for around $30-$35 if you tire of Titleist’s pricing.

Pro V1 And Z-Star Compared

The Z-Star is similar to the Pro V1 in terms of construction and performance.

They are both 3-piece balls with urethane covers. Depending on where you get your information from the Srixon has a slightly higher compression rating which in theory means it should feel firmer but I can’t say I could tell the difference.

As well as the standard Z-Star there is the XV version. The Z-Star XV is a 4-piece ball for players looking to achieve maximum distance while the Diamond version is a compromise bal tha bridges the gap between the two balls.

Titleist dominates the golf ball market in part due to the success of the Pro V1 and Pro V1x. They are some of the biggest selling balls on the market. They have added a couple of balls to the Pro V1 family recently, the left dot and the left dash. The left dot is a lower-spin, lower flying version of the Pro V1. The left dash is similarly a lower spinning, lower flying version of the Pro V1x.

Driver Testing

If you take a look at numerous different reports on the performance of golf balls you will quickly realize that within a particular category the balls will all perform more or less the same. That shouldn’t really be surprising though since most manufacturers are trying to tempt you away from the market leader – in this case the Pro V1.

Some people will debate the merits of testing with a robot but its the only way to get a fair comparison when testing balls.

In one set of tests the ProV1 was 2 yards longer than the ZStar, so not too much to shout about there. The Titleist did have a tighter dispersion though by about 2 yards. On that basis a really good golfer might make a convincing case to stick with the Pro V1 but for most of us our swings will be causing more problems.

There wasn’t much difference in the spin rates either averaging about 50 rpms. So not likely to make a great deal of difference to the outcome of a shot.

Wedge Testing

During the same robot testing there was only a 75 rpm between the balls so its unlikely anyone could detect that out on the golf course.

Titleist again won out on the dispersion stakes but the Srixon wasn’t far behind and again for all but the best players I doubt it would make a difference to their scores.

Alternative Tour Quality Golf Balls

If you prefer to use a tour quality ball but don’t want to play top dollar then there are some other premium type balls to try.

A big change in recent years has been the rise of the direct-to-consumer (DTC) ball company. Companies such as Snell, Vice Golf, Cut, Seed and OnCore all produce urethane-covered premium golf balls for around $30-$35. If you want to save some cash then they are definitely worth trying out.

If you prefer tour validation then the TaylorMade TP5 seems to be played by a lot of pros right now with Rory McIlroy being the standout. Many cite the fact it is great in windy conditions.

Bridgestone has a number of different balls in the segment and Callaway has the softest ball in the category, the Chrome Soft. If you want to save lots of cash then give the Kirkland Signature Performance a go.

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Titleist Pro V1 Golf Balls

Titleist Pro V1 golf balls are made for golfers looking for high-performance balls. They feature reduced spin off the driver, and stable flight. The Pro V1’s multi-component construction includes a soft compression core, and a urethane elastomer cover. The ball provides excellent distance, control and durability. If you’re looking to improve your game or play at a high level, Pro V1 balls are a excellent choice.

ALSO GREAT

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Srixon Z-Star Golf Balls

The Srixon Z-Star golf balls are designed for advanced golfers looking for a combination of distance, control, and feel. They feature Srixon’s patented Spin Skin coating, which increases friction for more spin on short shots, and a 338 Speed Dimple pattern that reduces drag for improved distance. The Srixon Z-Star is a 3-piece golf ball and is available in white and yellow color options. With its combination of distance, control, and feel, the Z-Star is a versatile option for golfers of all skill levels.

Srixon Z-Star vs Titleist Pro V1: Conclusion

In terms of value for money I don’t think there is any question that the Z-Star wins hands down. Unless you are a very skilled player you are not likely to notice any difference in the performance of the balls but the Z-Star is as much as 1/3 cheaper.

In tests the Titleist just shades it but in the real world I’m not sure most of us would see a difference in the scores we shoot.

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